Tooth Replacement

Not many years ago, losing a tooth left you with few options for replacement. While permanent teeth should provide a lifetime of function, it doesn't always end up that way. They may be lost from an accident, deep cavities, or gum disease. And since teeth start as a full set, even one missing tooth may disrupt the complex function of chewing, the first step in digestion. As teeth slowly lean and migrate into extra spaces, wear and cracking from excessive forces often create escalating problems.

When it's time to replace missing teeth, whether it's one or a full set, several options might be available to you. Dental implants often give you the best opportunity to enjoy normal chewing and a full smile, although all therapeutic possibilities deserve consideration.

We know it's not always easy for you to sort through the complicated possibilities. Dr. Freundlich's background in restorative dentistry allow them to develop solutions for every scenario.

Porcelain Bridges


Whenever you cruise across a bridge over the water, you're being supported by the same principles that hold a dental bridge. Critical stabilization on each side helps bear the load, year after year. Teeth on either side of a space support a replacement tooth engineered from durable materials and glued into place. While this often serves for many years, the load-bearing teeth may deteriorate after thousands of chewing cycles. In some cases, this leads to more missing teeth.


Implant Restoration

If you are missing teeth it is usually important to replace them.  Without all of your teeth, chewing and eating can destabilize your bite and cause you discomfort.  When teeth are missing, your mouth can shift and even cause your face to look older.  Implants are a great way to replace your missing teeth, and if properly maintained, can last a lifetime!

An implant is a new tooth made of metal and porcelain that looks just like your natural tooth.  It's composed of two main parts: one part is the titanium implant body that takes the place of the missing root, and the second part is the tooth-colored crown that is cemented on top of the implant.

In addition to tooth replacement, implants may be used to anchor dentures, especially lower dentures that tend to shift when you talk or chew.  

We work with specialists (oral surgeons and periodontists) who place the implant while we restore the implant once they are ready.  It's a team effort to get the best result! (use same picture)